Reptiles

Due to the toxicity of their bites, mambas are widely regarded to be some of the most fear snakes in the world. Due to the toxicity of their bites, mambas rarely hold onto their prey in attempts to constrict it. Instead, after a single bite, they usually wait for the unlucky animal to succumb to paralysis and death. They do not have many predators. Snake eagles are known to prey upon mambas. The cape file snake, a smaller species of nonvenomous snakes that are immune to most snake poisons, are also known to prey upon mambas, though their smaller size makes it difficult. While not immune to poison entirely, the yellow mongoose has a high tolerance and is usually agile enough to avoid most bites, though such confrontations are rare. 

 

 

 

 

 

THE EASTERN GREEN MAMBA 

THE EASTERN GREEN MAMBA 

The Eastern Green Mamba, one of two species of mamba found in South Africa, is, arboreal. Its green coloring allows it to blend in with its environment, so they are often thought of as shy and elusive. They also tend to prefer to adopt a “sit and wait” ambush approach to finding food, as opposed to other snakes who actively forage for their meals. Males are usually just shy of six feet long, whereas females are usually over six feet. Like all mambas, the bite of an eastern green mamba is highly toxic with death occurring in as little as half an hour after the bite.

THE BLACK MAMBA

THE BLACK MAMBA

Unlike other mambas, black mambas generally prefer terrestrial abodes. Despite its name, black mambas are never black. They are usually a dark grey, but can be olive, brown, or khaki in coloration. Black mambas are the second largest known species of snake, usually measuring between six and nine feet in length, but able to grow to as long as fourteen feet. Though black mambas are the fastest snakes indigenous to Africa, stories of their speed have been greatly exaggerated. They cannot, for instance, outpace a galloping horse and there are no documented incidents of a snake moving faster than ten miles per hour.